5 Quotes Thoroughly Debunking “Democratic” Socialism From Ludwig von Mises

5 Quotes Thoroughly Debunking “Democratic” Socialism From Ludwig von Mises

Have a friend who constantly says, “it’s not socialism, it’s DEMOCRATIC socialism?” The next time you hear that, try this on them, “it’s not Nazism… it’s DEMOCRATIC Nazism.”

Ludwig von Mises was an Austrian-American economist whose seminal work Human Action is the backbone for modern libertarian views. As a Jew in Austria, Mises fled Europe in 1940 to avoid Nazi persecution. His work influenced several modern American economists such as Milton Friedman, and an institute bearing his name was built in Auburn, Alabama.

Mises was the enemy of socialism in all forms, so much so that while attending a meeting of the Mont Pelerin society, he reportedly flung the insult, “you’re all a bunch of socialists,” to a group consisting of such vaunted classical liberals as Milton Friedman and F.A. Hayek before storming out.

The dude was hardcore.

Here are some of the top 5 quotes from Ludwig Von Mises which destroy the philosophy of Bernie Sanders, Alexandria Ocasio-Cortez, and all Democratic Socialists.

#1. “If historical experience could teach us anything, it would be that private property is inextricably linked with civilization. There is no experience to the effect that socialism could provide a standard of living as high as that provided by capitalism”

In Mises’ book Human Action, the economist explains the importance of private property rights, and their intrinsic value in protecting freedom and building civilization. Mises argues that the advocates of totalitarianism believe that capitalism is a “ghastly evil,” but Mises believes that socialists suffer from what is known as the “calculation problem. (The economic calculation problem is a criticism of using economic planning as a substitute for market-based allocation of the factors of production.)

Mises had harsh words not just for the socialists of his day, but also for those who conflate cronyism or “crony capitalism” with true laissez-faire policies. He argued, “Today many or some groups of business are no longer liberal; they do not advocate a pure market economy and free enterprise, but, on the contrary, are asking for various measures of government interference with business.”

He also added on the same point that, “Confronted with the fact that some–but certainly not all-wealthy entrepreneurs and capitalists nowadays favor measures restricting free trade and competition and resulting in monopoly, they say: Contemporary capitalism stands for protectionism, cartels, and the abolition of competition. It is true, they add, that at a definite period of the past British capitalism favored free trade both on the domestic market and in international relations. This was because at that time the class interests of the British bourgeoisie were best served by such a policy. Conditions, however, changed and today capitalism, i.e., the doctrine advocated by the exploiters, aims at another policy.”

Click #2 below to read on

Austin Petersen
ADMINISTRATOR
PROFILE

Sponsored


Latest Stories

LIVE NOW! CLICK TO VIEW.
CURRENTLY OFFLINE