Recommended

7 Tips for Finding a New Job

Unemployment rates are down, and this means that now is a good time to look for a new job. Unfortunately, low employment rates do not automatically get you the job you want—there are annoying little things like qualification and skill—but it does increase your overall chances. We’re going to try to increase your chances even more by giving you tips that will help you get a new job.

Have a clear vision of what you want.

Having a clear vision of what you want involves reflecting on your ideal job situation. Try not to think of specific companies when doing this. Instead, focus on what you want to do and what your ideal work environment looks like and feels like. This, however, is only part of the process, and many people, unfortunately, stop here.

Be realistic in your approach.

Having a clear vision also involves being realistic in your approach. Remember those annoying little things we mentioned earlier (qualification and skill), those play a big role in the types of jobs you can get. Generally, when people change jobs, they usually apply to positions within the same field, but this doesn’t mean you shouldn’t brush up on your skills beforehand.

Research the company.

Your research should show you the company’s culture, their employment process including the types of questions asked during interviews, and your salary estimate—try applying to companies that offer higher salaries than the one you’re coming from. Your research will guide the way you write your résumé, here is some—advice on how to craft a great resume. Do not send out résumés in bulk, but tailor each resume to each company and only highlight experiences and achievements that are relevant to that role. After crafting your résumé, send it and cross your fingers.

Attend workshops and seminars.

Workshops and networking functions are a great way to meet and interact with representatives from companies where you want to work. Be careful not to come off as someone who is job hunting. Instead, focus more on sharing ideas and learning. Being able to connect with someone in the company might work out well for you as they would already see you as a creative person who can add value—this could land you an interview or even a job.

Use Linkedin.

Social media has long become a vehicle for hiring and Linkedin is the world leader in online hiring services. Most companies search LinkedIn for a suitable candidate, probably before putting out an ad for the position. If you’re not taking advantage of Linkedin, then you are at a disadvantage. Linkedin not only helps with visibility, but it also helps you to network with people and exposes you to the networks of others. It offers a level of connectedness that cannot be matched by conventional networking.

Your Linkedin profile should be interesting enough to warrant a second look, but it doesn’t need to be over the top. Highlight your relevant skills, experience, achievements, and volunteer work. You can also set your status to actively seeking a job without it being shown publicly on your profile. This way, Linkedin knows you’re looking and will send suggestions while also making your profile available to recruiters.

Keep an open mind.

Do not limit yourself to only one particular position at a company, no matter how badly you want it. Employees often end up in places where they don’t expect or want to be at first, but later appreciate. Factors outside your role and your boss contribute to your experience at a company. A survey by Paychex revealed that 63 percent of workers said quit their job because they were overworked, 32 percent didn’t get along with coworkers, and 41 percent cited a lack of work-life balance—these reasons are beyond your position and your boss. There are several other factors that many fail to consider that make or break their experience at a company.

We’re not saying don’t go for the job you want, go for it, but keep an open mind. You may want to a position in HR in a tech company, but end up getting a franchise opportunity that elevates your career.

Keep yourself busy.

During the period of searching for a job, engage in volunteer activities and pet projects. Employers appreciate employees who show initiative and this shows them that you’re a self-starter who doesn’t need to be told what to do. Make sure you include all your activities and projects in your résumé. Once you land the job, compare the best income protection insurance available with iSelect to be sure to get the best deal.