Canada’s New Law: One-For-One Regulation Elimination

Canada’s New Law: One-For-One Regulation Elimination

By: Laura Meyers

It pains me to say this, but the Canadians may have gotten it right for once.

Last month, the Canadian Government announced the success of a recently adopted resolution called the One-For-One Rule, which states that for every federal regulation created, one must be eliminated.

The resolution was first created in the Canadian west coast province of British Columbia, for the purpose of boosting small business in a time of economic turmoil.

“Forest companies were told what size nails they had to use the build a bridge. Restaurants were told what size televisions they could have in their establishments. Kids even were affected. They were being told they needed two permits to show a tadpole in their classroom at show and tell,” said Laura Jones, with the Canadian Federation of Independent Business.

After decreasing regulation by 40 percent, and watching small business blossom, the Government of Canada decided to follow British Columbia’s model.

So far, nineteen federal regulations have been eliminated, small businesses are estimated to save 98,000 hours per year in time spent dealing with regulatory red tape, and the law has reduced federal administrative burden by almost $20 million. Only rule is that no law regarding protections for health, safety, and the environment are hands-off; which helped make the bill an easy, bipartisan pass.

An interview with NPR with host Uri Berliner and Tony Clement, cabinet minister with Canada’s ruling Conservative Party reads as such:

BERLINER: I saw that the vote was 245 to one.

CLEMENT: Yes, the Green Party was a bit skeptical.

BERLINER: So even the socialists backed it?

CLEMENT: They did indeed. Yeah. In fact, we’re having a tussle with them as we move towards our election as to who is a better spokesperson for small business in Canada.

Now that’s what I’m talking aboot.

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