The libertarian Republican from Michigan, Justin Amash, has endorsed Ted Cruz for president.

In an op-ed in Independent Journal ReviewAmash first praised Rand Paul calling him the ‘most passionate defender of our rights on the national stage,’ lamenting that Paul has dropped out of the race.

He asks, “what now?”

It’s easy to withdraw from politics when the positions and priorities of the candidates do not precisely mirror our own. But we owe it to our beliefs to find constitutional conservative political allies who not only respect our philosophy but also fight for our views to be heard.

We have found such an ally in Senator Ted Cruz.

Amash doesn’t mince words. He acknowledges that Ted Cruz is not a libertarian nor claims to be. However, Amash argues that Cruz is “a principled defender of the Constitution, a brilliant strategist and debater who can defeat the Democratic nominee in the general election, and the only remaining candidate I trust to take on what he correctly calls the Washington Cartel.”

Amash also points out that the next president will likely have to appoint numerous Supreme Court Justices and makes the case that Ted Cruz is unquestionably the most qualified candidate to do so.

The recent passing of Justice Antonin Scalia reminds us of the importance of electing a president committed to nominating justices to the Supreme Court who will uphold the Constitution and the Rule of Law. Because the Court has not lost a conservative in many years, this selection may become the most influential act of the next president. Replacing Justice Scalia with a poorly chosen justice could alter our country’s identity on critical issues such as education, health care, criminal justice, privacy, and even the very meaning of the Constitution.

In this regard, history has given us a uniquely qualified candidate—Ted Cruz served as a Supreme Court clerk (an extraordinarily selective job held each year by fewer than 40 lawyers who work directly with the justices to shape the Court’s opinions) and has the rare distinction of having argued many cases before the Supreme Court. The importance of these credentials cannot be overstated in the current context.

Congressman Amash also hammered home that we need a president that will take on the “lobbyist class and the Washington elites.” While he concedes that libertarians and conservatives will not agree on every issue, Amash calls for unity.

An effective president for the people is going to face massive fights with the lobbyist class and Washington elites. It is not enough for a president to have smart advisers and well-rehearsed lines. Whether or not we agree on every issue, libertarian and conservative Republicans must choose a president who has the courage to stand up for the American people in the face of relentless attacks. Ted has shown that he is a true leader who can defend the principles of our constitutional republic, takes libertarian ideas seriously (even when he disagrees), and will not back down from the battles that must be fought.

He also applauded Cruz’s stance on cronyism and corporate welfare, highlighting that Cruz won Iowa even while opposing ethanol subsidies, even when Iowa’s popular governor was against him and “pundits warned nobody could win the state without pandering to the ethanol lobby.”

Amash paraded Cruz’s supporting of Paul’s amendment to kill the Cybersecurity Information Security Act of 2015 (CISA) and his opposition to Americans being indefinitely detained without a trial. On foreign policy, he cited Cruz’s opposition to both the Libyan War and the arming Syrian rebels.

He concludes:

To defend liberty, we must defend our Constitution. I’m supporting Ted because, knowing him personally and having served with him in Congress over the past few years, I trust him as a conservative ally who consistently listens to my perspective and stands firm for what he believes is right.

 

About The Author

Elias J. Atienza

Elias J. Atienza is a budding writer and journalist. He is currently majoring in history at Cal Poly San Luis Obispo and writes for the Libertarian Republic and a campus correspondent for Campus Reform. He is also an opinion writer for TheBlaze and Journal by IJ Review. Elias's articles have been referenced by Reason and Inquistr. Follow him on Twitter @elias_atienza

9 Responses

  1. BiscuitKingofSouthDakota
    BiscuitKingofSouthDakota

    I personally think Amash is going out of his way to be more than kind to Cruz.

    The idea that Cruz is “opposition to Americans being indefinitely detained without a trial” is a tricky subject. Cruz has repeatedly introduced a bill to give the government the power to strip citizenship. It seems like the only logical reason to do so is so that the person who had their citizenship stripped could be denied due process (and be detained indefinitely or executed).

    Amash mentioned Cruz as not being interested in nation building or other such entanglements. But, honestly, how far can we trust Cruz in that manner considering Cruz has repeatedly praised John Bolton. Within the last week or so, Cruz even went as far to say a Cruz admin Sec of State would be someone like Bolton.

    • jaez

      BiscuitKing, Ted Cruz NEVER introduced such a bill and you know it. Your accusation is just another Trump tactic of throwing lies out to the public in hopes that the masses will believe it.

      That’s right, BiscuitKing, I’m calling you a liar because you are. NONE of Trump’s unfounded accusations about Cruz can be proven. Trump believes that if you repeat a lie often enough, people will start believing it. Trump knew he couldn’t compete on Cruz’s level of intelligent and integrity, so Trump started his own campaign to make people believe that Cruz was a liar, when in fact IT IS TRUMP WHO IS THE LIAR — not presidential material, if you think about it.

      • jaez

        We Investigated, Donald Trump is Named in at Least 169 Federal Lawsuits

        by Rachel Stockman | 10:40 am, February 16th, 2016
                       ____________

        Donald Trump has been named in at least 169 federal lawsuits, according to a LawNewz.com investigation. They read like a history of  Trump’s business failures, successes, and bombastic personality. With Trump threatening a lawsuit against Ted Cruz, his surge in the polls, and his big win in New Hampshire, we thought now was as good a time as any to review of some of the Donald’s legal skirmishes. The federal lawsuits that we reviewed date back to 1983 and involve everything from business disputes, antitrust claims and, more recently, accusations that Trump’s campaign statements are discriminatory against minorities. Some of the cases have been resolved, some were dismissed as frivolous, and others were privately settled. He’s been sued by celebrities, personal assistants, prisoners, people in mental hospitals, unions, and wealthy businessmen. Of course, Donald Trump has also done his fair share of suing as well.  The lawsuits on both sides provide a unique glimpse into some of the biggest battles involving the presidential candidate.  Just a note, the cases listed below only include those filed in U.S. federal court. Who knows how many others were filed in state courts around the country.

        Here are some highlights in chronological order:

        The first lawsuit we found was filed in 1983 by Harry Diduck, Joseph Hardy and members of the Local 95 pension fund against Donald Trump and Trump’s organization. Diduck’s and his crew contended that Trump cheated workers out of at least $300,000 in contributions to its benefit funds by secretly employing nonunion workers during the building of Trump Tower. After years of litigation including a bench trial, the case was finally closed in 1999, but we can’t get the details because the settlement agreement is sealed.

        The U.S. Department of Justice sued Trump for an antitrust violation in 1988 and won. Trump was forced to pay $750,000. The real-estate magnate agreed to pay the penalty stemming from his attempted takeovers of two companies. The feds said that his stock purchases in the companies violated the FTC’s notification requirements.

        1990 was a big legal year for Donald Trump. He was named as a defendant in 21 lawsuits filed by different businesses and individuals. Several sued him for securities fraud and breach of contract. Most of the complaints stem from the Trump’s corporation filing for Chapter 11 bankruptcy from creditors following the building of the Taj Mahal Casino in Atlantic City, New Jersey. By 1991, the resort was nearly $3 billion in debt, according to the New York Times.

        It’s not just Trump being sued. He hassued Palm Beach, where he has a home, at least three different times. In 1992, he filed a $100 million lawsuit over the membership club Mar-a-Lago, the council eventually “acquiesced” and allowed him to make some of his property into a private club. He then sued the Palm Beach Airport for noise violations, and tried to prevent them from expanding near his private club. Palm Beach County estimates that legal fights with Trump related to the airport have cost taxpayers at least $600,000. The most entertaining is probably the $25 million lawsuit he filed against the town, who cited him for displaying an American flag on his property. “The town council of Palm Beach should be ashamed of itself,” Trump said, according to Politico. “They’re fining me for putting up the American flag. This is probably a first in United States history.”

        Trump filed a civil racketeering lawsuit against wealthy financier Jay Pritzker in 1993 over the family’s management of the Grand Hyatt Hotel in New York City. The two were equal partners in the deal.

        A college student filed a lawsuit against Trump’s profit seeking college, Trump University, and a federal judge eventually ordered the school pay $798,000 in legal fees,according to Courthouse News. The student claimed the university and Trump engaged in deceptive practices, and that the seminars were nothing more than infomercials. Trump’s name was eventually dropped from the suit.

        In 2013, the New York AG sued Trump for $40 million saying he helped run a phony school — Trump University — which made false claims and steered students towards useless seminars.

      • BiscuitKingofSouthDakota
        BiscuitKingofSouthDakota

        jaez,

        Logical fallacy much? Not that it matters, but I’m far from a Trump supporter. Ted Cruz has introduced the bill at least twice now. Google is your friend, but to make it easier look at https://www.govtrack.us/congress/bills/113/s2779 and https://www.govtrack.us/congress/bills/114/s247. Here are a few news articles about the bill:

        http://reason.com/archives/2016/02/23/ted-cruzs-assault-on-the-citizenship-rig

        http://www.huffingtonpost.com/david-bier/ted-cruz-expatriate-terrorist-act_b_9029984.html

        https://www.aclu.org/letter/aclu-letter-urging-opposition-s-247-expatriate-terrorists-act-11-18

        Since this apparently is all some big conspiracy of lies started by Trump, here are articles dating prior to Trump’s candidacy. Some back as far as 2014 criticizing Cruz’s bill.

        http://www.nationalreview.com/article/412888/how-not-fight-terrorism-gabriel-malor

        https://www.aclu.org/aclu-urges-opposition-s-2779-expatriate-terrorists-act

        http://fusion.net/story/112900/the-expatriate-terrorist-act-an-american-culture-of-fear/

    • jaez

      We Investigated, Donald Trump is Named in at Least 169 Federal Lawsuits

      by Rachel Stockman | 10:40 am, February 16th, 2016
                     ____________

      Donald Trump has been named in at least 169 federal lawsuits, according to a LawNewz.com investigation. They read like a history of  Trump’s business failures, successes, and bombastic personality. With Trump threatening a lawsuit against Ted Cruz, his surge in the polls, and his big win in New Hampshire, we thought now was as good a time as any to review of some of the Donald’s legal skirmishes. The federal lawsuits that we reviewed date back to 1983 and involve everything from business disputes, antitrust claims and, more recently, accusations that Trump’s campaign statements are discriminatory against minorities. Some of the cases have been resolved, some were dismissed as frivolous, and others were privately settled. He’s been sued by celebrities, personal assistants, prisoners, people in mental hospitals, unions, and wealthy businessmen. Of course, Donald Trump has also done his fair share of suing as well.  The lawsuits on both sides provide a unique glimpse into some of the biggest battles involving the presidential candidate.  Just a note, the cases listed below only include those filed in U.S. federal court. Who knows how many others were filed in state courts around the country.

      Here are some highlights in chronological order:

      The first lawsuit we found was filed in 1983 by Harry Diduck, Joseph Hardy and members of the Local 95 pension fund against Donald Trump and Trump’s organization. Diduck’s and his crew contended that Trump cheated workers out of at least $300,000 in contributions to its benefit funds by secretly employing nonunion workers during the building of Trump Tower. After years of litigation including a bench trial, the case was finally closed in 1999, but we can’t get the details because the settlement agreement is sealed.

      The U.S. Department of Justice sued Trump for an antitrust violation in 1988 and won. Trump was forced to pay $750,000. The real-estate magnate agreed to pay the penalty stemming from his attempted takeovers of two companies. The feds said that his stock purchases in the companies violated the FTC’s notification requirements.

      1990 was a big legal year for Donald Trump. He was named as a defendant in 21 lawsuits filed by different businesses and individuals. Several sued him for securities fraud and breach of contract. Most of the complaints stem from the Trump’s corporation filing for Chapter 11 bankruptcy from creditors following the building of the Taj Mahal Casino in Atlantic City, New Jersey. By 1991, the resort was nearly $3 billion in debt, according to the New York Times.

      It’s not just Trump being sued. He hassued Palm Beach, where he has a home, at least three different times. In 1992, he filed a $100 million lawsuit over the membership club Mar-a-Lago, the council eventually “acquiesced” and allowed him to make some of his property into a private club. He then sued the Palm Beach Airport for noise violations, and tried to prevent them from expanding near his private club. Palm Beach County estimates that legal fights with Trump related to the airport have cost taxpayers at least $600,000. The most entertaining is probably the $25 million lawsuit he filed against the town, who cited him for displaying an American flag on his property. “The town council of Palm Beach should be ashamed of itself,” Trump said, according to Politico. “They’re fining me for putting up the American flag. This is probably a first in United States history.”

      Trump filed a civil racketeering lawsuit against wealthy financier Jay Pritzker in 1993 over the family’s management of the Grand Hyatt Hotel in New York City. The two were equal partners in the deal.

      A college student filed a lawsuit against Trump’s profit seeking college, Trump University, and a federal judge eventually ordered the school pay $798,000 in legal fees,according to Courthouse News. The student claimed the university and Trump engaged in deceptive practices, and that the seminars were nothing more than infomercials. Trump’s name was eventually dropped from the suit.

      In 2013, the New York AG sued Trump for $40 million saying he helped run a phony school — Trump University — which made false claims and steered students towards useless seminars.

  2. libertariantranslator
    libertariantranslator

    Conservatives care about one thing: forcing women to–against their will–produce brainwashable youths for mystical indoctrination. Our straddle plank on abortion does not defend any individual rights and ought to be deleted or replaced with the truth: “Women, pregnant or otherwise, are individuals possessed of rights and self-ownership. We therefore support the 14th Amendment, reaffirm Roe v. Wade and recognize that overpopulation is a public health hazard not to be exacerbated by infringing the rights of the female half of humanity.” No conservative–christian or mohammedan–would dare infiltrate and bring us into disrepute, and true liberals might even flock to our banner.

  3. libertariantranslator
    libertariantranslator

    Real libertarians endorse candidates that back the libertarian party platform. The spoiler votes we record are what causes the political ecosystem to evolve, repeal bigoted legislation and gain freedom.