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Written by Joshua Dietz

A recent survey of 1,000 American adults, conducted between June 14-15, 2017 found that seventy percent still believe that fatherhood is a man’s most important duty.  However, that is not the message reflected in American media.  As portrayed in advertisements and entertainment, men (particularly fathers) are boorish, inept, and a total drag to be around.  I mean, dads are totally useless, right?  Some would have you believe that anybody can do the job of a parent as well as a man, so what’s the difference?

This is an excellent example of the divide between what the average American believes, and what elitists and opinion-makers want Americans to believe.  With the prevalence of single-mother households continuing to rise, media personalities and celebrities among others, have taken up the cause of defaming men.

“Men are rapists.”  “Fathers aren’t necessary.”  “Women can be mothers AND fathers.”  “Sex is for pleasure, and husbands who demand fidelity from their wives are jerks.”

Given the decline in wealth, longevity, and quality of life, Americans can no longer afford listening to these charlatans.

The statistics about fatherless homes are in, and they are not good.  Here is a quick rundown:

Popular culture has rejected masculinity.  Men are practically absent from higher education, and have been struggling with unemployment since the Obama years.  Divorce court and its aftereffects are especially brutal for men.  Recent data shows that the rate of suicide has increased for divorced men between the ages of 35 and 54.

Generations of men have watched as their fathers and grandfathers were carelessly discarded by society, and so they took notes.  Philip Zimbardo, famed social psychologist, studied this phenomenon, calling it “The Demise of Guys”.  Journalist and media personality Milo Yiannopoulous calls it “The Sexodus”.  In sociology and related disciplines, it’s known as the disposable male theory.

Young men watched in horror as their progenitors sacrificed themselves for God, country, and family, only to be cast aside in the name of ‘progress’.  Many good (and some not so good) men have been lost to combat, divorce courts, drug addiction, and suicide.  Rather than honor the greatness of man, popular media regularly depicts him in an abhorrent and mockingly retrograde manner.

While the average American may still venerate man and his role as father, the mainstream culture does not.

Interestingly, Rasumussen published a survey earlier this year, on women and the significance of their roles as mothers.  A poll of 1,000 American adults found that favorable opinion towards motherhood is at an all-time low.  Perhaps this is part of a larger trend of demeaning the family structure.  The greatest thing either man or woman can do is to raise a family.  This fact should be self-evidently true, but sadly this is not the case.

It seems to me that it’s not even about undermining the family structure necessarily, but rather an attempt at undermining the most successful institutions humanity has ever constructed.  I’ve written before about the bitter, misguided people who want to destroy the prosperity of the West.  Those institutions begin with the men and women who built them.  To collapse the West, these misanthropic fops work to collapse the power of the individual, man and woman.

Misandry – the hatred for men – exists every bit as much as misogyny does.  Moreover, it ought to be met with the same kind of hostility that Progressives call for against misogyny.  Man and woman alike, should be celebrated for their abilities as individuals and for their abilities as a whole.

I hope you enjoyed your Father’s Day, I certainly did.  Just don’t let it be the only day of the year you show appreciation to the men in your life.  Or the women, for that matter.  Without mothers and fathers,  you wouldn’t be reading this and I wouldn’t have written it.


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